The MHS offers many engaging programs and special events.

May

Public Program Cooking Boston: Where to Go 3 May 2017.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30pm. James O'Connell, Corky White, Erwin Ramos and Moderator Peter Drummey Cooking Boston: Where to Go This series of programs explores the culinary history of Boston and the ...

Cooking Boston: Where to Go

This series of programs explores the culinary history of Boston and the impact the city has had on the American diet. In the first half of the 19th century, Boston had a reputation as the center for European taste and refinement. By the end of the 19th century, the Colonial Revival movement nationally popularized foods like Boston baked beans and Yankee pot-roast shifting Boston’s image from refined to rustic. In the 20th century, Boston clung to two identities: that of thrifty Puritans and of cosmopolitanism through education. This created some remarkably bland food but also made the city fertile ground for a culinary revolution. In the 1960s, chefs like Julia Child and Joyce Chen brought the flavors of the world to America through Boston.

 

Cooking Boston: How the Hub Shaped the American Diet 

This six program series will explore the culinary history of Boston and the impact the city has had on the American diet. In the first half of the 19th century, Boston had a reputation as the center for European taste and refinement. By the end of the 19th century, the Colonial Revival movement nationally popularized foods like Boston baked beans and Yankee pot-roast shifting Boston’s image from refined to rustic. In the 20th century, Boston clung to two identities: that of thrifty Puritans and of cosmopolitanism through education. This created some remarkably bland food but also made the city fertile ground for a culinary revolution. In the 1960s, chefs like Julia Child and Joyce Chen brought the flavors of the world to America through Boston.

The series will run from March through June of 2017. See the other programs in the series

More
Public Program The History and Collections of the MHS 6 May 2017.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition: The Irish Atlantic: A Story of Famine Migration and Opportunity.

More
Public Program Begin at the Beginning: Of One Blood? New England Slavery and Theology 6 May 2017.Saturday, 1:00PM - 3:00PM Please RSVP   The practice of slavery in the early modern Atlantic world generated a variety of theological ...

The practice of slavery in the early modern Atlantic world generated a variety of theological debates about its nature, origins, and legitimacy.  In New England, Puritan Samuel Sewall proclaimed that God “hath made of One Blood, all Nations of Men.” But the debate about God and slavery continued. Join us for a discussion led by PhD candidate Eduardo Gonzalez, Boston College. The discussion is based on primary readings listed on the registration page. 

More
Public Program Scars of Independence: America's Violent Birth 11 May 2017.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Please RSVP   There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30pm. Holger Hoock, University of Pittsburgh       The American Revolution is often portrayed as an orderly, restrained ...

 

 

 

The American Revolution is often portrayed as an orderly, restrained rebellion with brave patriots defending their noble ideals against an oppressive empire. Holger Hoock shows that the Revolution was not only a high-minded battle over principles but also a profoundly violent civil war that shaped the nation and the British Empire in ways we have only begun to understand.

More
Public Program Cooking Boston: Sweet Boston 18 May 2017.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Please RSVP   There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30pm. Joyce Chaplin, Michael Krondl, Carla Martin and Moderator Gavin Kleespies Cooking Boston: Sweet Boston Joyce Chaplin, Michael Krondl, Carla Martin and ...

Cooking Boston: Sweet Boston

Joyce Chaplin, Michael Krondl, Carla Martin and moderator Gavin Kleespies

The Boston area has long had an unusually strong interest in sweets. As we see from the numerous ice cream establishments, the huge concentration of candy manufacturers, the near-manic obsession with doughnuts, and the flourishing of companies on the cutting edge of chocolate and the cacao trade, Boston has been, and remains, a pioneer of the sweeter things in life.

Cooking Boston: How the Hub Shaped the American Diet 

This six program series will explore the culinary history of Boston and the impact the city has had on the American diet. In the first half of the 19th century, Boston had a reputation as the center for European taste and refinement. By the end of the 19th century, the Colonial Revival movement nationally popularized foods like Boston baked beans and Yankee pot-roast shifting Boston’s image from refined to rustic. In the 20th century, Boston clung to two identities: that of thrifty Puritans and of cosmopolitanism through education. This created some remarkably bland food but also made the city fertile ground for a culinary revolution. In the 1960s, chefs like Julia Child and Joyce Chen brought the flavors of the world to America through Boston.

The series will run from March through June of 2017. See the other programs in the series


More
Public Program The History and Collections of the MHS 20 May 2017.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition: The Irish Atlantic: A Story of Famine Migration and Opportunity.

More
Public Program My Fellow Soldiers: General John Pershing and the Americans Who Helped Win the Great War 20 May 2017.Saturday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Please RSVP   This program is FREE. Andrew Carroll, the Center for American War Letters at Chapman University General Pershing, who led all of the American troops in Europe during World War I, surmounted ...

General Pershing, who led all of the American troops in Europe during World War I, surmounted enormous obstacles to turn the U.S. army into a modern fighting force, but he was often perceived as a harsh, humorless, and wooden leader. My Fellow Soldiers draws on a trove of little-known and newly uncovered letters and diaries to create a vivid and moving account of the American experience in the war. As part of his “Million Letters Campaign,” Carroll will also discuss extraordinary stories and letters from other wars.

More
Public Program The House of Truth: A Washington Political Salon and the Foundations of American Liberalism 23 May 2017.Tuesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Please RSVP   There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30pm. Brad Snyder, University of Wisconsin, Madison       In 1912, a group of ambitious young men, including Felix Frankfurter and ...

 

 

 

In 1912, a group of ambitious young men, including Felix Frankfurter and Walter Lippmann, became disillusioned by the sluggish pace of change in the Taft Administration. They threw informal dinner parties at a Dupont Circle row house owned by Robert G. Valentine that they self-mockingly referred to as the “House of Truth.” The house became the city’s foremost political salon. Brad Snyder draws on the Valentine family papers at MHS to weave together the stories of these fascinating, combative, and sometimes contradictory figures, and looks at how ideas shifted from progressivism into what today we refer to as liberalism.

More
June
Clio 2017 Special Event Cocktails with Clio 1 June 2017.Thursday, 6:00PM - 9:00PM Featuring Jill Lepore in conversation with Robin Young Feast, sip, and celebrate history at the seventh Cocktails with Clio!  ...

Feast, sip, and celebrate history at the seventh Cocktails with Clio! 

Thursday, 1 June 2017
6:00 PM

John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum
Columbia Point
Boston, Massachusetts

Tickets are $300 per person

We invite you to join us for a festive evening in support of the Center for the Teaching of History at the MHS featuring Jill Lepore in conversation with Robin Young. The evening will begin with cocktails in the pavilion space overlooking the harbor. A seated dinner will follow.

Jill Lepore is the David Woods Kemper ’41 Professor of American History at Harvard University, a staff writer at The New Yorker, and the author of books including The Secret History of Wonder Woman and Book of Ages: The Life and Opinions of Jane Franklin. Robin Young is the co-host of Here & Now on 90.9 WBUR and NPR.


Become a sponsor of Cocktails with Clio

Our sponsors are crucial to the success of the event. As a result of their generosity, the Society’s educational and outreach efforts continue to expand. The additional funding provided by Clio enables the Center for the Teaching of History to offer a wide array of educational services including engaging workshops and hands-on student programs; online classroom tools; lesson plans and curricular resources; fellowships for students and teachers; and community partnerships. The Society also reaches out to students and teachers in its role as state sponsor of National History Day in Massachusetts. Become a sponsor and join with other history enthusiasts in demonstrating your commitment to promoting the study of American history and deepening our nation’s understanding of the diverse stories that define our past.  

For more information, visit www.masshist.org/clio/sponsor or e-mail cknauff@masshist.org.

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Public Program A Description of the New York Central Park 2 June 2017.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM This program is FREE. Maureen Meister           New York City’s Central Park receives millions of ...

 

 

 

 

 

New York City’s Central Park receives millions of visitors every year. A Description of the New York Central Park by Clarence C. Cook, published in 1869, is recognized as the most important book about the park to appear during its early years. This work has been republished with a new introduction by Maureen Meister that reveals Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux’s roles in the creation of the book, which served in part to champion their vision.

More
Public Program The History and Collections of the MHS 3 June 2017.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition: The Irish Atlantic: A Story of Famine Migration and Opportunity.

 

More
Public Program Cooking Boston: Ice Kings 6 June 2017.Tuesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30pm Gus Rancatore, Jeri Quinzio, and Judy Herrell   Cooking Boston: Ice Kings Gus Rancatore, Jeri Quinzio and Judy Herrell From the ice ...

 

Cooking Boston: Ice Kings

Gus Rancatore, Jeri Quinzio and Judy Herrell

From the ice harvesting business and Victorian ice cream parlors like Bailey’s to innovators like Steve’s, the Boston area has an unusual obsession with ice cream. Transplants from warmer parts of the country are often surprised to see ice cream shops still open— and full—on a frigid January night. Why is this area so devoted to ice cream and how have these institutions changed the country’s taste for frozen treats?

 

Cooking Boston: How the Hub Shaped the American Diet

This six program series will explore the culinary history of Boston and the impact the city has had on the American diet. In the first half of the 19th century, Boston had a reputation as the center for European taste and refinement. By the end of the 19th century, the Colonial Revival movement nationally popularized foods like Boston baked beans and Yankee pot-roast shifting Boston's image from refined to rustic. In the 20th century, Boston clung to two identities: that of thrifty Puritans and of cosmopolitanism through education. This created some remarkably bland food but also made the city fertile ground for a culinary revolution. In the 1960's, chefs like Julia Child and Joyce Chen brought the flavors of the world to America through Boston.

This series will run from March through June of 2017.

More
Public Program Apostle of Union: A Political Biography of Edward Everett 8 June 2017.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Please RSVP   There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30pm. Matthew Mason, Brigham Young University     Edward Everett had a distinguished career at every level of American politics from ...

 

 

Edward Everett had a distinguished career at every level of American politics from the 1820s through the Civil War. His career reveals a complex man whose shifting political opinions, especially on the topic of slavery, illuminate the nuances of Northern Unionism. Everett’s political and cultural efforts to preserve the Union, and the response to his work from citizens and politicians, help us see the complexity of the coming of the Civil War.

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Public Program The History and Collections of the MHS 10 June 2017.Saturday, all day The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition: The Irish Atlantic: A Story of Famine Migration and Opportunity.

More
Public Program Cooking Boston: Final Courses 15 June 2017.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   This program will be held at Mount Auburn Cemetery. Space is limited. Docents of Mount Auburn Cemetery   Cooking Boston: Final Courses Join Mount Auburn docents for a walking tour of the cemetery ...

 

Cooking Boston: Final Courses

Join Mount Auburn docents for a walking tour of the cemetery to visit the graves of notable chefs, inventors, and confectioners. Mount Auburn is the final resting place of 19th-century cookbook author Fanny Farmer, chefs Joyce Chen and Gian Franco Romagnoli, chocolate makers Walter Baker and William Schrafft, hotel impresario Harvey Parker of Boston’s famed Parker House, and many more.

Cooking Boston: How the Hub Shaped the American Diet

This six program series will explore the culinary history of Boston and the impact the city has had on the American diet. In the first half of the 19th century, Boston had a reputation as the center for European taste and refinement. By the end of the 19th century, the Colonial Revival movement nationally popularized foods like Boston baked beans and Yankee pot-roast shifting Boston's image from refined to rustic. In the 20th century, Boston clung to two identities: that of thrifty Puritans and of cosmopolitanism through education. This created some remarkably bland food but also made the city fertile ground for a culinary revolution. In the 1960's, chefs like Julia Child and Joyce Chen brought the flavors of the world to America through Boston.

The series will run from March through June of 2017.

More
Public Program The History and Collections of the MHS 17 June 2017.Saturday, all day The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition: The Irish Atlantic: A Story of Famine Migration and Opportunity.

More
Public Program Pedagogues and Protesters 20 June 2017.Tuesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Please RSVP   There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30pm. Conrad Wright, Massachusetts Historical Society       On April 4, 1768, in the largest student strike at any colonial college, ...

 

 

 

On April 4, 1768, in the largest student strike at any colonial college, well over half the student body of Harvard College left school and went home in protest against new rules about class preparation. Many contemporaries found the cause trivial, but in the undergraduates’ own minds it was the culmination of months of tensions with the faculty. Through the lens of the daily journal entries of Stephen Peabody, the best surviving account of colonial college life, Conrad E. Wright will guide us through the relationships among students, faculty members, and administrators.

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Public Program The History and Collections of the MHS 24 June 2017.Saturday, all day The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition: The Irish Atlantic: A Story of Famine Migration and Opportunity.

More
Public Program “Impossible Dreamers” The Pennant-Winning 1967 Boston Red Sox 24 June 2017.Saturday, 4:00PM - 5:30PM Please register and pay online using the RSVP link. Red Sox tickets must be purchased by Saturday, May 20th. Herb Crehan, Frank O’Brien, Tom Whalen, and Gordon Edes, Moderator In the spring of 1967, the Boston Red Sox were coming off a season in which they had lost 90 games, ...

In the spring of 1967, the Boston Red Sox were coming off a season in which they had lost 90 games, and seemingly were locked in a state of mediocrity. Owner Tom Yawkey was discussing the need for a new ballpark and even hinted he might sell the club. Boston was in the midst of one of its worst economic downturns and fan interest had tapered off, with attendance barely half of what it had been in the 1940s. That all changed when a 100 to 1 longshot ballclub led by a rookie manager, Dick Williams, and a superstar left fielder, Carl Yastrzemski, won the American League pennant on the final day of the season after one of the closest races in history. “The Impossible Dream Red Sox” transformed the franchise forever.

View a temporary exhibition. View rare photos of the 1967 season taken by retired Boston Globe photographer Frank O’Brien, a collection of 1967 artifacts including Carl Yastrzemski’s jersey, and the 2004, 2007, and 2013 World Series trophies (only on June 24th).

Attend a panel discussion. Moderated by Red Sox historian Gordon Edes, panelists include authors Herb Crehan (The Impossible Dream 1967 Red Sox: Birth of Red Sox Nation), Bill Nowlin (The 1967 Impossible Dream Red Sox: Pandemonium on the Field), and Tom Whalen (The Spirit of ’67: Cardiac Kids, El Birdos, and the World Series That Captivated America).

Enjoy a Red Sox game. Take a short walk to Fenway Park and enjoy a 7:15 PM game in a section of seats designated for the MHS and the panel. Please purchase your Red Sox ticket package by May 20th using the RSVP link.

Image courtesy of Frank O'Brien

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Public Program The Price for their Pound of Flesh: The Value of the Enslaved, from Womb to Grave, in the Building of a Nation 26 June 2017.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Please RSVP   There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30pm. Daina Ramey Berry, University of Texas at Austin     In life and in death, slaves were commodities. Their monetary value was assigned ...

 

 

In life and in death, slaves were commodities. Their monetary value was assigned based on their age, gender, health, and the demands of the market. The Price for Their Pound of Flesh explores the economic value of enslaved people through every phase of their lives, including preconception, infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood, senior years, and death. Covering the full “life cycle,” historian Daina Ramey Berry shows the lengths to which enslavers would go to maximize profits and protect their investments and how enslaved people recalled and responded to being appraised, bartered, and sold throughout the course of their lives.

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Public Program The Many Captivities of Esther Wheelwright 28 June 2017.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Please RSVP   There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30pm. Ann Little, Colorado State University       Born and raised in a New England garrison town, Esther Wheelwright ...

 

 

 

Born and raised in a New England garrison town, Esther Wheelwright (1696–1780) was captured by Wabanaki Indians at age seven. Among them, she became a Catholic and lived like any other young girl in the tribe. At age twelve, she was enrolled at a French-Canadian Ursuline convent, where she would spend the rest of her life, eventually becoming the order’s only foreign-born mother superior. Among these three major cultures of colonial North America, Wheelwright’s life was exceptional: border-crossing, multilingual, and multicultural. Ann Little leads us through her life and the communities of girls and women around her.

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Public Program Cooking Boston: Where to Go registration required 3 May 2017.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30pm. James O'Connell, Corky White, Erwin Ramos and Moderator Peter Drummey

Cooking Boston: Where to Go

This series of programs explores the culinary history of Boston and the impact the city has had on the American diet. In the first half of the 19th century, Boston had a reputation as the center for European taste and refinement. By the end of the 19th century, the Colonial Revival movement nationally popularized foods like Boston baked beans and Yankee pot-roast shifting Boston’s image from refined to rustic. In the 20th century, Boston clung to two identities: that of thrifty Puritans and of cosmopolitanism through education. This created some remarkably bland food but also made the city fertile ground for a culinary revolution. In the 1960s, chefs like Julia Child and Joyce Chen brought the flavors of the world to America through Boston.

 

Cooking Boston: How the Hub Shaped the American Diet 

This six program series will explore the culinary history of Boston and the impact the city has had on the American diet. In the first half of the 19th century, Boston had a reputation as the center for European taste and refinement. By the end of the 19th century, the Colonial Revival movement nationally popularized foods like Boston baked beans and Yankee pot-roast shifting Boston’s image from refined to rustic. In the 20th century, Boston clung to two identities: that of thrifty Puritans and of cosmopolitanism through education. This created some remarkably bland food but also made the city fertile ground for a culinary revolution. In the 1960s, chefs like Julia Child and Joyce Chen brought the flavors of the world to America through Boston.

The series will run from March through June of 2017. See the other programs in the series

close
Public Program The History and Collections of the MHS this event is free 6 May 2017.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition: The Irish Atlantic: A Story of Famine Migration and Opportunity.

close
Public Program Begin at the Beginning: Of One Blood? New England Slavery and Theology Please RSVP   registration required at no cost 6 May 2017.Saturday, 1:00PM - 3:00PM

The practice of slavery in the early modern Atlantic world generated a variety of theological debates about its nature, origins, and legitimacy.  In New England, Puritan Samuel Sewall proclaimed that God “hath made of One Blood, all Nations of Men.” But the debate about God and slavery continued. Join us for a discussion led by PhD candidate Eduardo Gonzalez, Boston College. The discussion is based on primary readings listed on the registration page. 

close
Public Program Scars of Independence: America's Violent Birth Please RSVP   registration required 11 May 2017.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30pm. Holger Hoock, University of Pittsburgh

 

 

 

The American Revolution is often portrayed as an orderly, restrained rebellion with brave patriots defending their noble ideals against an oppressive empire. Holger Hoock shows that the Revolution was not only a high-minded battle over principles but also a profoundly violent civil war that shaped the nation and the British Empire in ways we have only begun to understand.

close
Public Program Cooking Boston: Sweet Boston Please RSVP   registration required 18 May 2017.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30pm. Joyce Chaplin, Michael Krondl, Carla Martin and Moderator Gavin Kleespies

Cooking Boston: Sweet Boston

Joyce Chaplin, Michael Krondl, Carla Martin and moderator Gavin Kleespies

The Boston area has long had an unusually strong interest in sweets. As we see from the numerous ice cream establishments, the huge concentration of candy manufacturers, the near-manic obsession with doughnuts, and the flourishing of companies on the cutting edge of chocolate and the cacao trade, Boston has been, and remains, a pioneer of the sweeter things in life.

Cooking Boston: How the Hub Shaped the American Diet 

This six program series will explore the culinary history of Boston and the impact the city has had on the American diet. In the first half of the 19th century, Boston had a reputation as the center for European taste and refinement. By the end of the 19th century, the Colonial Revival movement nationally popularized foods like Boston baked beans and Yankee pot-roast shifting Boston’s image from refined to rustic. In the 20th century, Boston clung to two identities: that of thrifty Puritans and of cosmopolitanism through education. This created some remarkably bland food but also made the city fertile ground for a culinary revolution. In the 1960s, chefs like Julia Child and Joyce Chen brought the flavors of the world to America through Boston.

The series will run from March through June of 2017. See the other programs in the series


close
Public Program The History and Collections of the MHS this event is free 20 May 2017.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition: The Irish Atlantic: A Story of Famine Migration and Opportunity.

close
Public Program My Fellow Soldiers: General John Pershing and the Americans Who Helped Win the Great War Please RSVP   registration required at no cost 20 May 2017.Saturday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM This program is FREE. Andrew Carroll, the Center for American War Letters at Chapman University

General Pershing, who led all of the American troops in Europe during World War I, surmounted enormous obstacles to turn the U.S. army into a modern fighting force, but he was often perceived as a harsh, humorless, and wooden leader. My Fellow Soldiers draws on a trove of little-known and newly uncovered letters and diaries to create a vivid and moving account of the American experience in the war. As part of his “Million Letters Campaign,” Carroll will also discuss extraordinary stories and letters from other wars.

close
Public Program The House of Truth: A Washington Political Salon and the Foundations of American Liberalism Please RSVP   registration required 23 May 2017.Tuesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30pm. Brad Snyder, University of Wisconsin, Madison

 

 

 

In 1912, a group of ambitious young men, including Felix Frankfurter and Walter Lippmann, became disillusioned by the sluggish pace of change in the Taft Administration. They threw informal dinner parties at a Dupont Circle row house owned by Robert G. Valentine that they self-mockingly referred to as the “House of Truth.” The house became the city’s foremost political salon. Brad Snyder draws on the Valentine family papers at MHS to weave together the stories of these fascinating, combative, and sometimes contradictory figures, and looks at how ideas shifted from progressivism into what today we refer to as liberalism.

close
Special Event Cocktails with Clio registration required 1 June 2017.Thursday, 6:00PM - 9:00PM Featuring Jill Lepore in conversation with Robin Young Clio 2017

Feast, sip, and celebrate history at the seventh Cocktails with Clio! 

Thursday, 1 June 2017
6:00 PM

John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum
Columbia Point
Boston, Massachusetts

Tickets are $300 per person

We invite you to join us for a festive evening in support of the Center for the Teaching of History at the MHS featuring Jill Lepore in conversation with Robin Young. The evening will begin with cocktails in the pavilion space overlooking the harbor. A seated dinner will follow.

Jill Lepore is the David Woods Kemper ’41 Professor of American History at Harvard University, a staff writer at The New Yorker, and the author of books including The Secret History of Wonder Woman and Book of Ages: The Life and Opinions of Jane Franklin. Robin Young is the co-host of Here & Now on 90.9 WBUR and NPR.


Become a sponsor of Cocktails with Clio

Our sponsors are crucial to the success of the event. As a result of their generosity, the Society’s educational and outreach efforts continue to expand. The additional funding provided by Clio enables the Center for the Teaching of History to offer a wide array of educational services including engaging workshops and hands-on student programs; online classroom tools; lesson plans and curricular resources; fellowships for students and teachers; and community partnerships. The Society also reaches out to students and teachers in its role as state sponsor of National History Day in Massachusetts. Become a sponsor and join with other history enthusiasts in demonstrating your commitment to promoting the study of American history and deepening our nation’s understanding of the diverse stories that define our past.  

For more information, visit www.masshist.org/clio/sponsor or e-mail cknauff@masshist.org.

close
Public Program A Description of the New York Central Park this event is free 2 June 2017.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM This program is FREE. Maureen Meister

 

 

 

 

 

New York City’s Central Park receives millions of visitors every year. A Description of the New York Central Park by Clarence C. Cook, published in 1869, is recognized as the most important book about the park to appear during its early years. This work has been republished with a new introduction by Maureen Meister that reveals Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux’s roles in the creation of the book, which served in part to champion their vision.

close
Public Program The History and Collections of the MHS this event is free 3 June 2017.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition: The Irish Atlantic: A Story of Famine Migration and Opportunity.

 

close
Public Program Cooking Boston: Ice Kings Please RSVP   registration required 6 June 2017.Tuesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30pm Gus Rancatore, Jeri Quinzio, and Judy Herrell

 

Cooking Boston: Ice Kings

Gus Rancatore, Jeri Quinzio and Judy Herrell

From the ice harvesting business and Victorian ice cream parlors like Bailey’s to innovators like Steve’s, the Boston area has an unusual obsession with ice cream. Transplants from warmer parts of the country are often surprised to see ice cream shops still open— and full—on a frigid January night. Why is this area so devoted to ice cream and how have these institutions changed the country’s taste for frozen treats?

 

Cooking Boston: How the Hub Shaped the American Diet

This six program series will explore the culinary history of Boston and the impact the city has had on the American diet. In the first half of the 19th century, Boston had a reputation as the center for European taste and refinement. By the end of the 19th century, the Colonial Revival movement nationally popularized foods like Boston baked beans and Yankee pot-roast shifting Boston's image from refined to rustic. In the 20th century, Boston clung to two identities: that of thrifty Puritans and of cosmopolitanism through education. This created some remarkably bland food but also made the city fertile ground for a culinary revolution. In the 1960's, chefs like Julia Child and Joyce Chen brought the flavors of the world to America through Boston.

This series will run from March through June of 2017.

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Public Program Apostle of Union: A Political Biography of Edward Everett Please RSVP   registration required 8 June 2017.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30pm. Matthew Mason, Brigham Young University

 

 

Edward Everett had a distinguished career at every level of American politics from the 1820s through the Civil War. His career reveals a complex man whose shifting political opinions, especially on the topic of slavery, illuminate the nuances of Northern Unionism. Everett’s political and cultural efforts to preserve the Union, and the response to his work from citizens and politicians, help us see the complexity of the coming of the Civil War.

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Public Program The History and Collections of the MHS this event is free 10 June 2017.Saturday, all day

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition: The Irish Atlantic: A Story of Famine Migration and Opportunity.

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Public Program Cooking Boston: Final Courses Please RSVP   registration required 15 June 2017.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM This program will be held at Mount Auburn Cemetery. Space is limited. Docents of Mount Auburn Cemetery

 

Cooking Boston: Final Courses

Join Mount Auburn docents for a walking tour of the cemetery to visit the graves of notable chefs, inventors, and confectioners. Mount Auburn is the final resting place of 19th-century cookbook author Fanny Farmer, chefs Joyce Chen and Gian Franco Romagnoli, chocolate makers Walter Baker and William Schrafft, hotel impresario Harvey Parker of Boston’s famed Parker House, and many more.

Cooking Boston: How the Hub Shaped the American Diet

This six program series will explore the culinary history of Boston and the impact the city has had on the American diet. In the first half of the 19th century, Boston had a reputation as the center for European taste and refinement. By the end of the 19th century, the Colonial Revival movement nationally popularized foods like Boston baked beans and Yankee pot-roast shifting Boston's image from refined to rustic. In the 20th century, Boston clung to two identities: that of thrifty Puritans and of cosmopolitanism through education. This created some remarkably bland food but also made the city fertile ground for a culinary revolution. In the 1960's, chefs like Julia Child and Joyce Chen brought the flavors of the world to America through Boston.

The series will run from March through June of 2017.

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Public Program The History and Collections of the MHS this event is free 17 June 2017.Saturday, all day

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition: The Irish Atlantic: A Story of Famine Migration and Opportunity.

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Public Program Pedagogues and Protesters Please RSVP   registration required 20 June 2017.Tuesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30pm. Conrad Wright, Massachusetts Historical Society

 

 

 

On April 4, 1768, in the largest student strike at any colonial college, well over half the student body of Harvard College left school and went home in protest against new rules about class preparation. Many contemporaries found the cause trivial, but in the undergraduates’ own minds it was the culmination of months of tensions with the faculty. Through the lens of the daily journal entries of Stephen Peabody, the best surviving account of colonial college life, Conrad E. Wright will guide us through the relationships among students, faculty members, and administrators.

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Public Program The History and Collections of the MHS this event is free 24 June 2017.Saturday, all day

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition: The Irish Atlantic: A Story of Famine Migration and Opportunity.

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Public Program “Impossible Dreamers” The Pennant-Winning 1967 Boston Red Sox registration required 24 June 2017.Saturday, 4:00PM - 5:30PM Please register and pay online using the RSVP link. Red Sox tickets must be purchased by Saturday, May 20th. Herb Crehan, Frank O’Brien, Tom Whalen, and Gordon Edes, Moderator

In the spring of 1967, the Boston Red Sox were coming off a season in which they had lost 90 games, and seemingly were locked in a state of mediocrity. Owner Tom Yawkey was discussing the need for a new ballpark and even hinted he might sell the club. Boston was in the midst of one of its worst economic downturns and fan interest had tapered off, with attendance barely half of what it had been in the 1940s. That all changed when a 100 to 1 longshot ballclub led by a rookie manager, Dick Williams, and a superstar left fielder, Carl Yastrzemski, won the American League pennant on the final day of the season after one of the closest races in history. “The Impossible Dream Red Sox” transformed the franchise forever.

View a temporary exhibition. View rare photos of the 1967 season taken by retired Boston Globe photographer Frank O’Brien, a collection of 1967 artifacts including Carl Yastrzemski’s jersey, and the 2004, 2007, and 2013 World Series trophies (only on June 24th).

Attend a panel discussion. Moderated by Red Sox historian Gordon Edes, panelists include authors Herb Crehan (The Impossible Dream 1967 Red Sox: Birth of Red Sox Nation), Bill Nowlin (The 1967 Impossible Dream Red Sox: Pandemonium on the Field), and Tom Whalen (The Spirit of ’67: Cardiac Kids, El Birdos, and the World Series That Captivated America).

Enjoy a Red Sox game. Take a short walk to Fenway Park and enjoy a 7:15 PM game in a section of seats designated for the MHS and the panel. Please purchase your Red Sox ticket package by May 20th using the RSVP link.

Image courtesy of Frank O'Brien

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Public Program The Price for their Pound of Flesh: The Value of the Enslaved, from Womb to Grave, in the Building of a Nation Please RSVP   registration required 26 June 2017.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30pm. Daina Ramey Berry, University of Texas at Austin

 

 

In life and in death, slaves were commodities. Their monetary value was assigned based on their age, gender, health, and the demands of the market. The Price for Their Pound of Flesh explores the economic value of enslaved people through every phase of their lives, including preconception, infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood, senior years, and death. Covering the full “life cycle,” historian Daina Ramey Berry shows the lengths to which enslavers would go to maximize profits and protect their investments and how enslaved people recalled and responded to being appraised, bartered, and sold throughout the course of their lives.

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Public Program The Many Captivities of Esther Wheelwright Please RSVP   registration required 28 June 2017.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30pm. Ann Little, Colorado State University

 

 

 

Born and raised in a New England garrison town, Esther Wheelwright (1696–1780) was captured by Wabanaki Indians at age seven. Among them, she became a Catholic and lived like any other young girl in the tribe. At age twelve, she was enrolled at a French-Canadian Ursuline convent, where she would spend the rest of her life, eventually becoming the order’s only foreign-born mother superior. Among these three major cultures of colonial North America, Wheelwright’s life was exceptional: border-crossing, multilingual, and multicultural. Ann Little leads us through her life and the communities of girls and women around her.

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