January

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Brown Bag Skulls, Selves, and Showmanship: Itinerant Phrenologists in 19th-Century America 17 January 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Kathrinne Duffy, Brown University "Come, then, one and all, and learn to know yourselves." With these words, a traveling phrenologist ...

"Come, then, one and all, and learn to know yourselves." With these words, a traveling phrenologist advertised his lecture to the public. Proponents of phrenology — a controversial, influential science — believed that the shape of one’s cranium revealed one’s character. This talk explores the world of phrenological lecture-demonstrations and the circulation of materialist ideas about the self.

More
Brown Bag Indian Doctresses: Race, Labor, and Medicine in the 19th-century United States 31 January 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Angela Hudson, Texas A&M University This project focuses on women who worked as Indian doctresses and the clients who sought their care ...

This project focuses on women who worked as Indian doctresses and the clients who sought their care. The study strives to more fully integrate indigeneity into fields of study from which it is often absent, most notably labor history and the history of medicine.

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February
Brown Bag John Winthrop, Benjamin Martin, & Worlds of Scientific Work 7 February 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Pierce Williams, Carnegie Mellon University Benjamin Martin was regarded by natural philosophers of his age as a showman and peddler of pseudo ...

Benjamin Martin was regarded by natural philosophers of his age as a showman and peddler of pseudo-scientific trinkets. At the same time, John Winthrop was working to elevate the North American colonies in the topography of learned culture. This project attempts to understand Winthrop's puzzling choice of Martin to refurbish Harvard's scientific instrument collection after the college laboratory burned to the ground in 1764.

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Brown Bag Billets & Barracks: The Quartering Act & the Coming of the American Revolution 21 February 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM John McCurdy, Eastern Michigan University The arrival of British soldiers in the 1750s forced Americans to ask “where do soldiers ...

The arrival of British soldiers in the 1750s forced Americans to ask “where do soldiers belong?” This project investigates how they answered this question, arguing that it prompted them to rethink the meaning of places like the home and the city, as well as to reevaluate British military power.

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March
Brown Bag A Massachusetts Family's Exile & Return, 1775-1790 7 March 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM G. Patrick O'Brien, University of South Carolina After being forced to flee Marblehead in May 1775, the Robie family joined fellow refugees in ...

After being forced to flee Marblehead in May 1775, the Robie family joined fellow refugees in Halifax, Nova Scotia. In exile, each family member developed a unique perspective on his or her new home and outlook for the future. Repatriation further complicated these understandings and divided the family between two nations. This project explores how a family in exile struggled to maintain kinship networks while its members adapted to a new social environment.

More
Brown Bag From Corporate Charter to Modern Constitution: Massachusetts Transformations 21 March 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM David Ciepley, University of Denver The U.S. Constitution is not a “social contract,” but a popularly issued corporate ...

The U.S. Constitution is not a “social contract,” but a popularly issued corporate charter.  America’s constitutional innovations—constitutional conventions, written charters, judicial review, and charter amendment—represent a transfer of the governance mechanisms of corporations to the state.  Ciepley's current project examines the roots of this new mode of constitutionalism in New England’s corporate colonies.

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Brown Bag Learning the Values of a Dollar: Childhood & Cultures of Economy, 1825-1900 28 March 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Jaclyn Schultz, University of California at Santa Cruz Nineteenth-century children rarely had access to money, even when they worked. Yet, several forms ...

Nineteenth-century children rarely had access to money, even when they worked. Yet, several forms of authority instructed children in specific expectations of spending, saving, and giving. This talk explores how and why children were taught to interact with and value financial resources as well as how these lessons were racialized.

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April
Brown Bag Native Americans in the Antislavery Movement 4 April 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Natalie Joy, Northern Illinois University This presentation explores Native American participation in the American antislavery movement from ...

This presentation explores Native American participation in the American antislavery movement from the 1830s to the 1860s. In addition to attending meetings, Indians signed petitions, donated money, organized fundraising fairs, held positions in antislavery societies, and assisted fugitive slaves. Most significantly, they influenced abolitionist thought on a number of issues.

More
Brown Bag #sayhername: Recovering the Itinerant Ministry of Zilpha Elaw, 1820-1873 11 April 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Kimberly Blockett, Pennsylvania State University at Brandywine During the Second Great Awakening, almost all denominations discouraged female preachers. Of course, ...

During the Second Great Awakening, almost all denominations discouraged female preachers. Of course, some women did it anyway. Elaw ignored her husband and clergy, faced significant danger, and preached from Maine to Virginia. Then famous, now Elaw and her published Memoirs are mostly unknown. Blockett will discuss the silences of race and gender in the archive.

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Brown Bag Skulls, Selves, and Showmanship: Itinerant Phrenologists in 19th-Century America 17 January 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Kathrinne Duffy, Brown University

"Come, then, one and all, and learn to know yourselves." With these words, a traveling phrenologist advertised his lecture to the public. Proponents of phrenology — a controversial, influential science — believed that the shape of one’s cranium revealed one’s character. This talk explores the world of phrenological lecture-demonstrations and the circulation of materialist ideas about the self.

close
Brown Bag Indian Doctresses: Race, Labor, and Medicine in the 19th-century United States 31 January 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Angela Hudson, Texas A&M University

This project focuses on women who worked as Indian doctresses and the clients who sought their care. The study strives to more fully integrate indigeneity into fields of study from which it is often absent, most notably labor history and the history of medicine.

close
Brown Bag John Winthrop, Benjamin Martin, & Worlds of Scientific Work 7 February 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Pierce Williams, Carnegie Mellon University

Benjamin Martin was regarded by natural philosophers of his age as a showman and peddler of pseudo-scientific trinkets. At the same time, John Winthrop was working to elevate the North American colonies in the topography of learned culture. This project attempts to understand Winthrop's puzzling choice of Martin to refurbish Harvard's scientific instrument collection after the college laboratory burned to the ground in 1764.

close
Brown Bag Billets & Barracks: The Quartering Act & the Coming of the American Revolution 21 February 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM John McCurdy, Eastern Michigan University

The arrival of British soldiers in the 1750s forced Americans to ask “where do soldiers belong?” This project investigates how they answered this question, arguing that it prompted them to rethink the meaning of places like the home and the city, as well as to reevaluate British military power.

close
Brown Bag A Massachusetts Family's Exile & Return, 1775-1790 7 March 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM G. Patrick O'Brien, University of South Carolina

After being forced to flee Marblehead in May 1775, the Robie family joined fellow refugees in Halifax, Nova Scotia. In exile, each family member developed a unique perspective on his or her new home and outlook for the future. Repatriation further complicated these understandings and divided the family between two nations. This project explores how a family in exile struggled to maintain kinship networks while its members adapted to a new social environment.

close
Brown Bag From Corporate Charter to Modern Constitution: Massachusetts Transformations 21 March 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM David Ciepley, University of Denver

The U.S. Constitution is not a “social contract,” but a popularly issued corporate charter.  America’s constitutional innovations—constitutional conventions, written charters, judicial review, and charter amendment—represent a transfer of the governance mechanisms of corporations to the state.  Ciepley's current project examines the roots of this new mode of constitutionalism in New England’s corporate colonies.

close
Brown Bag Learning the Values of a Dollar: Childhood & Cultures of Economy, 1825-1900 28 March 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Jaclyn Schultz, University of California at Santa Cruz

Nineteenth-century children rarely had access to money, even when they worked. Yet, several forms of authority instructed children in specific expectations of spending, saving, and giving. This talk explores how and why children were taught to interact with and value financial resources as well as how these lessons were racialized.

close
Brown Bag Native Americans in the Antislavery Movement 4 April 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Natalie Joy, Northern Illinois University

This presentation explores Native American participation in the American antislavery movement from the 1830s to the 1860s. In addition to attending meetings, Indians signed petitions, donated money, organized fundraising fairs, held positions in antislavery societies, and assisted fugitive slaves. Most significantly, they influenced abolitionist thought on a number of issues.

close
Brown Bag #sayhername: Recovering the Itinerant Ministry of Zilpha Elaw, 1820-1873 11 April 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Kimberly Blockett, Pennsylvania State University at Brandywine

During the Second Great Awakening, almost all denominations discouraged female preachers. Of course, some women did it anyway. Elaw ignored her husband and clergy, faced significant danger, and preached from Maine to Virginia. Then famous, now Elaw and her published Memoirs are mostly unknown. Blockett will discuss the silences of race and gender in the archive.

close

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