March

Brown Bag A Massachusetts Family's Exile & Return, 1775-1790 7 March 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM G. Patrick O'Brien, University of South Carolina After being forced to flee Marblehead in May 1775, the Robie family joined fellow refugees in ...

After being forced to flee Marblehead in May 1775, the Robie family joined fellow refugees in Halifax, Nova Scotia. In exile, each family member developed a unique perspective on his or her new home and outlook for the future. Repatriation further complicated these understandings and divided the family between two nations. This project explores how a family in exile struggled to maintain kinship networks while its members adapted to a new social environment.

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Brown Bag Learning the Values of a Dollar: Childhood & Cultures of Economy, 1825-1900 28 March 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Jaclyn Schultz, University of California at Santa Cruz Nineteenth-century children rarely had access to money, even when they worked. Yet, several forms ...

Nineteenth-century children rarely had access to money, even when they worked. Yet, several forms of authority instructed children in specific expectations of spending, saving, and giving. This talk explores how and why children were taught to interact with and value financial resources as well as how these lessons were racialized.

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April
Brown Bag Native Americans in the Antislavery Movement 4 April 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Natalie Joy, Northern Illinois University This presentation explores Native American participation in the American antislavery movement from ...

This presentation explores Native American participation in the American antislavery movement from the 1830s to the 1860s. In addition to attending meetings, Indians signed petitions, donated money, organized fundraising fairs, held positions in antislavery societies, and assisted fugitive slaves. Most significantly, they influenced abolitionist thought on a number of issues.

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Brown Bag #sayhername: Recovering the Itinerant Ministry of Zilpha Elaw, 1820-1873 11 April 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Kimberly Blockett, Pennsylvania State University at Brandywine During the Second Great Awakening, almost all denominations discouraged female preachers. Of course, ...

During the Second Great Awakening, almost all denominations discouraged female preachers. Of course, some women did it anyway. Elaw ignored her husband and clergy, faced significant danger, and preached from Maine to Virginia. Then famous, now Elaw and her published Memoirs are mostly unknown. Blockett will discuss the silences of race and gender in the archive.

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Brown Bag A Massachusetts Family's Exile & Return, 1775-1790 this event is free 7 March 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM G. Patrick O'Brien, University of South Carolina

After being forced to flee Marblehead in May 1775, the Robie family joined fellow refugees in Halifax, Nova Scotia. In exile, each family member developed a unique perspective on his or her new home and outlook for the future. Repatriation further complicated these understandings and divided the family between two nations. This project explores how a family in exile struggled to maintain kinship networks while its members adapted to a new social environment.

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Brown Bag Learning the Values of a Dollar: Childhood & Cultures of Economy, 1825-1900 this event is free 28 March 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Jaclyn Schultz, University of California at Santa Cruz

Nineteenth-century children rarely had access to money, even when they worked. Yet, several forms of authority instructed children in specific expectations of spending, saving, and giving. This talk explores how and why children were taught to interact with and value financial resources as well as how these lessons were racialized.

close
Brown Bag Native Americans in the Antislavery Movement this event is free 4 April 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Natalie Joy, Northern Illinois University

This presentation explores Native American participation in the American antislavery movement from the 1830s to the 1860s. In addition to attending meetings, Indians signed petitions, donated money, organized fundraising fairs, held positions in antislavery societies, and assisted fugitive slaves. Most significantly, they influenced abolitionist thought on a number of issues.

close
Brown Bag #sayhername: Recovering the Itinerant Ministry of Zilpha Elaw, 1820-1873 this event is free 11 April 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Kimberly Blockett, Pennsylvania State University at Brandywine

During the Second Great Awakening, almost all denominations discouraged female preachers. Of course, some women did it anyway. Elaw ignored her husband and clergy, faced significant danger, and preached from Maine to Virginia. Then famous, now Elaw and her published Memoirs are mostly unknown. Blockett will discuss the silences of race and gender in the archive.

close

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