May

Brown Bag Politics of Civil War Governance: A Conversation about Lincoln and his Loyal Governors during the Civil War 3 May 2017.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Stephen Engle, Florida Atlantic University Engle will discuss his most recent book, Gathering to Save a Nation: Lincoln and the Union&rsquo ...

Engle will discuss his most recent book, Gathering to Save a Nation: Lincoln and the Union’s War Governors (2016) and how it led to his current project, a biography of Massachusetts Governor John Albion Andrew. In particular, he will explore the relationship between the federal government and the northern states as seen through the lens of Union governors

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Brown Bag Avian Affinities and Refashioning Roles: Feathers, Millinery and American Bird Protection 10 May 2017.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Emily Gephart, School of the Museum of Fine Arts at Tufts University In his Arcades Project, Walter Benjamin argued that fashion’s pursuit of novelty ...

In his Arcades Project, Walter Benjamin argued that fashion’s pursuit of novelty functioned in modern society as an attempt to stave off the inevitability of death. Yet, in millinery fashion at the turn of the 20th century, death was often conspicuously visible: popular plumed hats provoked crises in global extinction, inspired passionate advocacy for bird protection and trade restriction, and led—eventually—to wholesale changes in fashionable tastes. The story of how bird death led to rejection of fashion’s mandates is neither swift, nor direct, nor simple, but reveals a complex politics of hybridity, in which roles, refusal, and refashioning play off of one another in dynamic exchange.

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June
Brown Bag From Southern Plantation to Northern Mill: Traveling the Cotton Trail During the Civil War 7 June 2017.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM David Montejano, University of California, Berkeley During the Civil War, all commercial relations between North and South were ruptured and declared ...

During the Civil War, all commercial relations between North and South were ruptured and declared treasonous. Nonetheless, a vigorous cotton trade between both sides re-emerged through the neutral port of Matamoros, Mexico. The politics of war were seemingly trumped by the “invisible hand” of the market. Professor Montejano approaches this conundrum by following the cotton stream from Texas to Massachusetts and making visible the many hands involved in this suspect wartime commerce.

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Brown Bag Politics of Civil War Governance: A Conversation about Lincoln and his Loyal Governors during the Civil War this event is free 3 May 2017.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Stephen Engle, Florida Atlantic University

Engle will discuss his most recent book, Gathering to Save a Nation: Lincoln and the Union’s War Governors (2016) and how it led to his current project, a biography of Massachusetts Governor John Albion Andrew. In particular, he will explore the relationship between the federal government and the northern states as seen through the lens of Union governors

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Brown Bag Avian Affinities and Refashioning Roles: Feathers, Millinery and American Bird Protection this event is free 10 May 2017.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Emily Gephart, School of the Museum of Fine Arts at Tufts University

In his Arcades Project, Walter Benjamin argued that fashion’s pursuit of novelty functioned in modern society as an attempt to stave off the inevitability of death. Yet, in millinery fashion at the turn of the 20th century, death was often conspicuously visible: popular plumed hats provoked crises in global extinction, inspired passionate advocacy for bird protection and trade restriction, and led—eventually—to wholesale changes in fashionable tastes. The story of how bird death led to rejection of fashion’s mandates is neither swift, nor direct, nor simple, but reveals a complex politics of hybridity, in which roles, refusal, and refashioning play off of one another in dynamic exchange.

close
Brown Bag From Southern Plantation to Northern Mill: Traveling the Cotton Trail During the Civil War this event is free 7 June 2017.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM David Montejano, University of California, Berkeley

During the Civil War, all commercial relations between North and South were ruptured and declared treasonous. Nonetheless, a vigorous cotton trade between both sides re-emerged through the neutral port of Matamoros, Mexico. The politics of war were seemingly trumped by the “invisible hand” of the market. Professor Montejano approaches this conundrum by following the cotton stream from Texas to Massachusetts and making visible the many hands involved in this suspect wartime commerce.

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