September 2019
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Brown_Bags//peggotty_beach_postcard_with_third_cliff_jpeg_-_crop.jpg Brown Bag Suffragists of Scituate 25 September 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Lyle Nyberg, Scituate Historical Society A hundred years ago, several nationally prominent suffragists spent summers in Scituate, which had ...

A hundred years ago, several nationally prominent suffragists spent summers in Scituate, which had become a popular seaside destination. They included Inez Haynes Irwin, who wrote the history of the National Woman’s Party, and Judith Winsor Smith, who wrote for the Woman’s Journal and gave public speeches into her 90s promoting a woman’s right to vote. This talk examines their little-known stories and unique relationship to Scituate.

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October 2019
Brown Bag Autonomous and Independent: Native Activists and the Rejection of U.S. Citizenship, 1906-1924 2 October 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Lila Teeters, University of New Hampshire In the early 20th century, U.S. Congressmen attempted to make every Native within the territorial ...

In the early 20th century, U.S. Congressmen attempted to make every Native within the territorial boundaries of the United States a citizen. Native activists, many committed to cultural integrity and the maintenance of tribal sovereignty, thwarted Congressional efforts for almost two decades. This talk follows the Native individuals and nations who led the protest against U.S. citizenship and analyzes how their fights shaped citizenship policies at large

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Brown_Bags//7286_mark_work_lg.jpg Brown Bag, Research Fellow The Last & Living Words of Mark: Following the Clues to the Enslaved Man’s Life, Afterlife, and to his Community in Boston, Charlestown, and South Shore Massachusetts 16 October 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Catherine Sasanov, Independent Researcher Mark (1725-1755), a blacksmith, husband, and father, might have slipped from public memory if not ...

Mark (1725-1755), a blacksmith, husband, and father, might have slipped from public memory if not for his brutal end: his body gibbeted for decades on Charlestown Common for the poisoning of his enslaver, John Codman. This project, grounded in Mark’s testimony, approaches “legal” and other documents as crime scenes; attention to clues, connections, and seemingly insignificant details unlock important, previously unrecognized aspects of Mark’s world, thwarting their original intent: the enforcement of slavery’s status quo.

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November 2019
Brown Bag Laboring Bodies: Dispossessed Women and Sexuality in Colonial New England 6 November 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Emily Clark, Johns Hopkins University This project will examine the intimate lives of enslaved, servant, and poor women using cases in ...

This project will examine the intimate lives of enslaved, servant, and poor women using cases in which their supposedly “deviant” bodies entered the historical record – in court cases, almshouse ledgers, and cheap print. Often overlooked in histories of New England, these women made up a crucial part of colonial society. Their bodies and labors (productive and reproductive) were used against their wills. Nonetheless, these sources reveal laboring women's everyday efforts to control their own bodies and sexualities.

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More events
Brown Bag Suffragists of Scituate this event is free 25 September 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Lyle Nyberg, Scituate Historical Society Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Brown_Bags//peggotty_beach_postcard_with_third_cliff_jpeg_-_crop.jpg

A hundred years ago, several nationally prominent suffragists spent summers in Scituate, which had become a popular seaside destination. They included Inez Haynes Irwin, who wrote the history of the National Woman’s Party, and Judith Winsor Smith, who wrote for the Woman’s Journal and gave public speeches into her 90s promoting a woman’s right to vote. This talk examines their little-known stories and unique relationship to Scituate.

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Brown Bag Autonomous and Independent: Native Activists and the Rejection of U.S. Citizenship, 1906-1924 this event is free 2 October 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Lila Teeters, University of New Hampshire

In the early 20th century, U.S. Congressmen attempted to make every Native within the territorial boundaries of the United States a citizen. Native activists, many committed to cultural integrity and the maintenance of tribal sovereignty, thwarted Congressional efforts for almost two decades. This talk follows the Native individuals and nations who led the protest against U.S. citizenship and analyzes how their fights shaped citizenship policies at large

close

Brown Bag, Research Fellow The Last & Living Words of Mark: Following the Clues to the Enslaved Man’s Life, Afterlife, and to his Community in Boston, Charlestown, and South Shore Massachusetts this event is free 16 October 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Catherine Sasanov, Independent Researcher Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Brown_Bags//7286_mark_work_lg.jpg

Mark (1725-1755), a blacksmith, husband, and father, might have slipped from public memory if not for his brutal end: his body gibbeted for decades on Charlestown Common for the poisoning of his enslaver, John Codman. This project, grounded in Mark’s testimony, approaches “legal” and other documents as crime scenes; attention to clues, connections, and seemingly insignificant details unlock important, previously unrecognized aspects of Mark’s world, thwarting their original intent: the enforcement of slavery’s status quo.

close

Brown Bag Laboring Bodies: Dispossessed Women and Sexuality in Colonial New England this event is free 6 November 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Emily Clark, Johns Hopkins University

This project will examine the intimate lives of enslaved, servant, and poor women using cases in which their supposedly “deviant” bodies entered the historical record – in court cases, almshouse ledgers, and cheap print. Often overlooked in histories of New England, these women made up a crucial part of colonial society. Their bodies and labors (productive and reproductive) were used against their wills. Nonetheless, these sources reveal laboring women's everyday efforts to control their own bodies and sexualities.

close


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