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October 2019
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Development//0067_massacre_header-image.jpg Special Event Fire! Voices from the Boston Massacre 30 October 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM MHS Fellows and Members are invited to the sneak preview reception for Fire! Voices from the Boston ...

MHS Fellows and Members are invited to the sneak preview reception for Fire! Voices from the Boston Massacre.

On March 5, 1770, British soldiers occupying the town of Boston shot into a crowd, killing five civilians. The incident quickly became known as the Boston Massacre. Through a selection of first-person accounts, artifacts, and trial notes, this exhibition explores what it meant to be living in an occupied city and how this flash point changed the course of American history.

Space is limited.

 

 

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November 2019
Public Program, Author Talk Girl in Black & White: The Story of Mary Mildred Williams & the Abolition Movement 6 November 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Jessie Morgan-Owens There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). Jessie Morgan-Owens tells the little-known story of Mary Mildred Williams—a slave girl who ...

Jessie Morgan-Owens tells the little-known story of Mary Mildred Williams—a slave girl who looked “white” and whose image transformed the abolitionist movement. Mary became the face of American slavery when Sen. Charles Sumner saw in her a monumental political opportunity for the abolitionist cause. Weaving together long-overlooked primary sources, including daguerreotypes found in the MHS collection, this history follows Mary through to her own adulthood, describing a life parallel to the antislavery movement. 

 

 

 

 

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Public Program, Author Talk The Will of the People: The Revolutionary Birth of America 7 November 2019.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. T.H. Breen, Northwestern University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). Over eight years of war, ordinary Americans accomplished something extraordinary. Far from the ...

Over eight years of war, ordinary Americans accomplished something extraordinary. Far from the actions of the Continental Congress and the Continental Army, they took responsibility for the course of the Revolution. In villages, towns, and cities from Georgia to New Hampshire, Americans managed local affairs, negotiated shared sacrifice, and participated in a political system in which each believed they were as good as any other. Presenting hundreds of stories, T. H. Breen captures the powerful sense of equality and responsibility resulting from this process of self-determination.

 

 

 

More
Building Closed Veteran's Day 11 November 2019.Monday, all day The Society is CLOSED in observance of Veteran's Day.

The Society is CLOSED in observance of Veteran's Day.

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Public Program, Conversation, Housing as History Housing as History: the Dudley Street Neighborhood Initiative and Orchard Gardens 13 November 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Karilyn Crockett, Lecturer of Public Policy and Urban Planning, MIT; Tony Hernandez, Director of Operations and Stewardship, Dudley Neighbors, Inc.; Valerie Shelley, President, Orchard Gardens Resident Association Location: Dewitt Center, 122 Dewitt Drive, Boston, MA 02120 By the 1980s the Dudley Square neighborhood of Roxbury was facing significant challenges. Absentee ...

By the 1980s the Dudley Square neighborhood of Roxbury was facing significant challenges. Absentee landlords had allowed property to deteriorate, left units vacant, or had used arson to raze buildings and make insurance claims. Facing what many considered insurmountable obstacles, the Dudley Street Neighborhood Initiative was formed to create a comprehensive plan for “development without displacement.” The first non-governmental organization in America to be granted eminent domain authority, they began purchasing vacant land, protecting affordable housing and creating a community land trust. Meanwhile, the nearby housing project Orchard Park became notorious for crime and drugs. The Orchard Park Tenants Association lobbied for years for improvements and by the mid-1990s began to see a path forward partnering with the police and using community organizing to reduce crime and linking the redevelopment to the new federal HOPE VI program which was meant to revitalize the worst housing projects in America. HOPE VI was in part modeled on the redevelopment of Columbia Point and encouraged partnerships with private developers and a mixture of incomes among the residents. Through community action and smart development, Orchard Park was redeveloped as Orchard Gardens and became a safe, stable neighborhood.

This program is made possible by the generosity of Mass Humanities and the Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard University.

More
Public Program, Conversation Atlas of Boston History 14 November 2019.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Nancy Seasholes, Robert Allison, Richard Garver, and Jim Vrabel There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). Few American cities possess a history as long, rich, and fascinating as Boston’s. The Atlas of ...

Few American cities possess a history as long, rich, and fascinating as Boston’s. The Atlas of Boston History traces the history of Boston from late prehistoric times to the present using thematic maps that are drawn from the latest scholarship and supplemented with historical images, maps, illustrations, and graphs as well as explanatory text. The subjects of the maps and atlas plates were determined by a board of noted scholars. The editor will present the project and then discuss the process of determining the contents of the atlas with three of the consulting scholars.

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Public Program, Conversation, Legacies of 1619 Legacies of 1619: Black Radicalism / Black Power 16 November 2019.Saturday, 4:00PM - 5:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 3:30. John Stauffer, Harvard University; Jeffrey O.G. Ogbar, University of Connecticut; Adrienne Lentz-Smith, Duke University; and moderator Valerie Roberson, Roxbury Community College Location: Roxbury Community College, Student Commons, 1234 Columbus Avenue Facing the hegemonic force of slavery, discrimination, and disenfranchisement, communities of color ...

Facing the hegemonic force of slavery, discrimination, and disenfranchisement, communities of color have resisted and presented radical models of empowerment. Along with countless and often unknown stories of personal courage, large scale resistance, such as Nat Turner’s Rebellion, go back to the very beginnings of the United States. This program will explore the different forms African Americans have taken to assert their agency and autonomy.

This program is part three of a four program series titled Legacies of 1619. The series is a production of the Massachusetts Historical Society and is co-sponsored by the Museum of African American History and the Roxbury Community College. 

   

More
Public Program, Author Talk This Land Is Their Land The Wampanoag Indians, Plymouth Colony, and the Troubled History of Thanksgiving 18 November 2019.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. David J. Silverman, George Washington University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). David Silverman explores the history of the Wampanoag people to reveal the distortions of the ...

David Silverman explores the history of the Wampanoag people to reveal the distortions of the Thanksgiving Myth, a persisting story that promotes the idea that Native people willingly ceded their country to the English to give rise to a white, Christian, democratic nation. Silverman traces how the Wampanoags have lived—and told—a different history over the past four centuries

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Public Program, Conversation, Legacies of 1619 Housing as History: New Directions for Boston’s Subsidized Housing: Learning from the Past 20 November 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. William McGonagle, former Administrator, Boston Housing Authority; Soni Gupta, Director of Neighborhoods and Housing, The Boston Foundation; Lawrence Vale, Ford Professor of Urban Design and Planning, MIT; Sandra Henriquez, Executive Director, Detroit Housing Commission; former administrator and CEO, Boston Housing Authority; and moderator David Luberoff, Deputy Director, Harvard Joint Center for Housing Studies This program will be held at MHS. As neighborhoods across Boston face enormous development pressure, there is a risk that low-income ...

As neighborhoods across Boston face enormous development pressure, there is a risk that low-income residents will be forced out of the city. Social disruption due to gentrification, shifting government policies and programs, and the challenges of climate change make the future of affordable housing in Boston precarious. In the past, Boston modeled creative and successful solutions to dire housing problems, and there is hope that the city can continue to deploy innovative policies that will brighten the future for all city residents. Our final panel in this series will look at the future of affordable housing in Boston, taking stock of past lessons learned.

 

 

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Special Event Fire! Voices from the Boston Massacre Register registration required at no cost 30 October 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Development//0067_massacre_header-image.jpg

MHS Fellows and Members are invited to the sneak preview reception for Fire! Voices from the Boston Massacre.

On March 5, 1770, British soldiers occupying the town of Boston shot into a crowd, killing five civilians. The incident quickly became known as the Boston Massacre. Through a selection of first-person accounts, artifacts, and trial notes, this exhibition explores what it meant to be living in an occupied city and how this flash point changed the course of American history.

Space is limited.

 

 

close

Public Program, Author Talk Girl in Black & White: The Story of Mary Mildred Williams & the Abolition Movement Register registration required 6 November 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Jessie Morgan-Owens There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

Jessie Morgan-Owens tells the little-known story of Mary Mildred Williams—a slave girl who looked “white” and whose image transformed the abolitionist movement. Mary became the face of American slavery when Sen. Charles Sumner saw in her a monumental political opportunity for the abolitionist cause. Weaving together long-overlooked primary sources, including daguerreotypes found in the MHS collection, this history follows Mary through to her own adulthood, describing a life parallel to the antislavery movement. 

 

 

 

 

close

Public Program, Author Talk The Will of the People: The Revolutionary Birth of America Register registration required 7 November 2019.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. T.H. Breen, Northwestern University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

Over eight years of war, ordinary Americans accomplished something extraordinary. Far from the actions of the Continental Congress and the Continental Army, they took responsibility for the course of the Revolution. In villages, towns, and cities from Georgia to New Hampshire, Americans managed local affairs, negotiated shared sacrifice, and participated in a political system in which each believed they were as good as any other. Presenting hundreds of stories, T. H. Breen captures the powerful sense of equality and responsibility resulting from this process of self-determination.

 

 

 

close

Building Closed Veteran's Day 11 November 2019.Monday, all day

The Society is CLOSED in observance of Veteran's Day.

close

Public Program, Conversation, Housing as History Housing as History: the Dudley Street Neighborhood Initiative and Orchard Gardens Register registration required at no cost 13 November 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Karilyn Crockett, Lecturer of Public Policy and Urban Planning, MIT; Tony Hernandez, Director of Operations and Stewardship, Dudley Neighbors, Inc.; Valerie Shelley, President, Orchard Gardens Resident Association Location: Dewitt Center, 122 Dewitt Drive, Boston, MA 02120

By the 1980s the Dudley Square neighborhood of Roxbury was facing significant challenges. Absentee landlords had allowed property to deteriorate, left units vacant, or had used arson to raze buildings and make insurance claims. Facing what many considered insurmountable obstacles, the Dudley Street Neighborhood Initiative was formed to create a comprehensive plan for “development without displacement.” The first non-governmental organization in America to be granted eminent domain authority, they began purchasing vacant land, protecting affordable housing and creating a community land trust. Meanwhile, the nearby housing project Orchard Park became notorious for crime and drugs. The Orchard Park Tenants Association lobbied for years for improvements and by the mid-1990s began to see a path forward partnering with the police and using community organizing to reduce crime and linking the redevelopment to the new federal HOPE VI program which was meant to revitalize the worst housing projects in America. HOPE VI was in part modeled on the redevelopment of Columbia Point and encouraged partnerships with private developers and a mixture of incomes among the residents. Through community action and smart development, Orchard Park was redeveloped as Orchard Gardens and became a safe, stable neighborhood.

This program is made possible by the generosity of Mass Humanities and the Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard University.

close

Public Program, Conversation Atlas of Boston History Register registration required 14 November 2019.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Nancy Seasholes, Robert Allison, Richard Garver, and Jim Vrabel There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

Few American cities possess a history as long, rich, and fascinating as Boston’s. The Atlas of Boston History traces the history of Boston from late prehistoric times to the present using thematic maps that are drawn from the latest scholarship and supplemented with historical images, maps, illustrations, and graphs as well as explanatory text. The subjects of the maps and atlas plates were determined by a board of noted scholars. The editor will present the project and then discuss the process of determining the contents of the atlas with three of the consulting scholars.

close

Public Program, Conversation, Legacies of 1619 Legacies of 1619: Black Radicalism / Black Power Register registration required at no cost 16 November 2019.Saturday, 4:00PM - 5:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 3:30. John Stauffer, Harvard University; Jeffrey O.G. Ogbar, University of Connecticut; Adrienne Lentz-Smith, Duke University; and moderator Valerie Roberson, Roxbury Community College Location: Roxbury Community College, Student Commons, 1234 Columbus Avenue

Facing the hegemonic force of slavery, discrimination, and disenfranchisement, communities of color have resisted and presented radical models of empowerment. Along with countless and often unknown stories of personal courage, large scale resistance, such as Nat Turner’s Rebellion, go back to the very beginnings of the United States. This program will explore the different forms African Americans have taken to assert their agency and autonomy.

This program is part three of a four program series titled Legacies of 1619. The series is a production of the Massachusetts Historical Society and is co-sponsored by the Museum of African American History and the Roxbury Community College. 

   

close

Public Program, Author Talk This Land Is Their Land The Wampanoag Indians, Plymouth Colony, and the Troubled History of Thanksgiving Register registration required 18 November 2019.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. David J. Silverman, George Washington University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

David Silverman explores the history of the Wampanoag people to reveal the distortions of the Thanksgiving Myth, a persisting story that promotes the idea that Native people willingly ceded their country to the English to give rise to a white, Christian, democratic nation. Silverman traces how the Wampanoags have lived—and told—a different history over the past four centuries

close

Public Program, Conversation, Legacies of 1619 Housing as History: New Directions for Boston’s Subsidized Housing: Learning from the Past Register registration required 20 November 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. William McGonagle, former Administrator, Boston Housing Authority; Soni Gupta, Director of Neighborhoods and Housing, The Boston Foundation; Lawrence Vale, Ford Professor of Urban Design and Planning, MIT; Sandra Henriquez, Executive Director, Detroit Housing Commission; former administrator and CEO, Boston Housing Authority; and moderator David Luberoff, Deputy Director, Harvard Joint Center for Housing Studies This program will be held at MHS.

As neighborhoods across Boston face enormous development pressure, there is a risk that low-income residents will be forced out of the city. Social disruption due to gentrification, shifting government policies and programs, and the challenges of climate change make the future of affordable housing in Boston precarious. In the past, Boston modeled creative and successful solutions to dire housing problems, and there is hope that the city can continue to deploy innovative policies that will brighten the future for all city residents. Our final panel in this series will look at the future of affordable housing in Boston, taking stock of past lessons learned.

 

 

close


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