May 2019
Brown Bag Shinbone and Beefsteak: Meat, Science, and the Labor Question 1 May 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Molly S. Laas, University of Göttingen Medical School Could better nutrition help shore up U.S. democracy in an era of mass inequality? This talk explores ...

Could better nutrition help shore up U.S. democracy in an era of mass inequality? This talk explores the early years of nutrition science in the late nineteenth century by examining the science’s use as a tool for cultural and political change. By looking at how scientists understood the relationship between wages, the cost of living, and better nutrition, my paper will shed light on the political life of scientific ideas.

More
MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 4 May 2019.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

More
Public Program Preserving Family Papers 4 May 2019.Saturday, 11:30AM - 1:00PM Registration for this workshop is now full. Do you have boxes full of family papers and photographs sitting in your closet, basement, or attic? ...

Do you have boxes full of family papers and photographs sitting in your closet, basement, or attic? Are you wondering how to best preserve those precious memories for generations to come? Let the experts at the MHS teach you simple steps you can take to preserve your paper-based materials. This workshop concludes with a behind-the-scenes tour including our conservation lab and library stacks.

More
Notice Library Closing @ 3:00PM 4 May 2019.Saturday, all day In preparation for a public program, the library closes at 3:00PM.

In preparation for a public program, the library closes at 3:00PM.

More
Public Program, Conversation The Problem of Democracy: The Presidents Adams Confront the Cult of Personality 4 May 2019.Saturday, 4:30PM - 6:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 4:00. Nancy Isenberg and Andrew Burstein There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). John and John Quincy Adams were brilliant, prickly politicians and arguably the most independently ...

John and John Quincy Adams were brilliant, prickly politicians and arguably the most independently minded among leaders of the founding generation. Distrustful of blind allegiance to a political party, they brought skepticism of a brand-new system of government to the country’s first 50 years. Join Isenberg and Burstein as they boldly recast the historical role of the Adamses and reflect on how father and son understood the inherent weaknesses in American democracy.

More
Abigail Adams: Nature and Nurture, Pop-up Display and Talk 6 May 2019.Monday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM The Pop-up Display will be on view from April 29-June 28 May 6 at 2:00 PM: Join an Adams Papers editor for an in-depth look at the display. “The Earth is putting on a new Suit,” Abigail Adams wrote, savoring the arrival of ...

“The Earth is putting on a new Suit,” Abigail Adams wrote, savoring the arrival of spring amid the tumult of national politics in 1800. Tending her kitchen garden and nurturing the new republic with equal care, Abigail delighted in learning about the natural landscape and sharing that knowledge with her family and friends.

 

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Early American History Seminar Panel: After the Fighting: The Struggle for Revolutionary Settlement 7 May 2019.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Eliga Gould, University of New Hampshire; Katherine Grandjean, Wellesley College; Stephen Marini, Wellesley College; Brendan McConville, Boston University Moderator: Alan Rogers, Boston College In the ten years after the American victory at Yorktown in 1781, the nation faced myriad problems ...

In the ten years after the American victory at Yorktown in 1781, the nation faced myriad problems and challenges. This panel examines how the revolutionary generation confronted issues of diplomacy, governance and economic growth, and how the legacies of warfare and political convulsion shaped spiritual and social behaviors in those troubled years.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

More
Brown Bag Odor and Power in the Americas: Olfactory Racism and the Atlantic World 8 May 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Andrew Kettler, University of Toronto This talk shows that capitalism incentivized discourses of African pungency applied by intellectuals ...

This talk shows that capitalism incentivized discourses of African pungency applied by intellectuals throughout the Atlantic World to justify racial dominance. Born of English literature, and agitated during the late Enlightenment, the idea that African bodies smelled perpetuates into modernity as a discourse of embodied racism.

More
Public Program Massachusetts in World War I 9 May 2019.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Theodore Sedgwick There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). On February 24, 1919, Pres. Woodrow Wilson arrived in Boston after completing the negotiations of ...

On February 24, 1919, Pres. Woodrow Wilson arrived in Boston after completing the negotiations of the Treaty of Versailles that ended World War I. He was met by a thunderous crowd; the Boston Evening Globe wrote “it seemed that every noise-making instrument in Boston had been set in motion.” The Yankee Division of the Massachusetts National Guard had been one of the first U.S. units deployed in the war. Bay State residents were some of the most active in the war, both on the front lines and in shipyards outfitting navy ships; however, somehow the Great War is often forgotten. This program will explore the history of Massachusetts in WWI as well as why the forgotten war should be remembered.

More
Teacher Workshop “Shall the Tail Wag the Dog?” The Fight For and Against Women’s Suffrage 11 May 2019.Saturday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Registration fee: $25 per person Massachusetts citizens played a central role in the suffrage movement; Worcester hosted the first ...

Massachusetts citizens played a central role in the suffrage movement; Worcester hosted the first national woman’s rights convention in 1850 and Bostonians, led by Lucy Stone, headed a national suffrage organization and edited a long-running woman’s rights newspaper. In response to these influential reformers, activists formed the first anti-suffrage organizations in Massachusetts as well. Drawing on MHS collections and our new suffrage exhibition, we will explore letters, newspapers, political cartoons, visual propaganda, and other sources that illuminate the history and motivations of women on both sides of the campaign for the vote.

This program is open to all K-12 educators. Teachers can earn 22.5 Professional Development Points or 1 graduate credit (for an additional fee).

If you have any questions, please contact Kate Melchior at education@masshist.org or 617-646-0588.

More
Public Program, Conversation Boston Women Designers: Then and Now 14 May 2019.Tuesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Mikyoung Kim, Tamara Roy, Regan Shields Ives, Justine Orlando, and moderator Catherine Allgor There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, Fenway Alliance and Boston Preservation Alliance members, or EBT cardholders). Join us for a conversation with women working in architecture, design, and planning. They will ...

Join us for a conversation with women working in architecture, design, and planning. They will explore social and political landscapes for women designers in Boston today and when they got started, some challenges they overcame to get to where they are today, how Boston compares with other cities on the topic of gender equity, and if Boston is receptive to women in leadership roles.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Brown_Bags//children4.jpg Brown Bag Beyond the Boundaries of Childhood: Black Children's Cultural and Political Resistance 15 May 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Crystal Webster, University of Texas at San Antonio This talk examines the lives of African American children in Philadelphia, New York, and Boston ...

This talk examines the lives of African American children in Philadelphia, New York, and Boston during the late-18th to early-20th centuries by focusing on Black children's labor, play, and schooling. It argues that northern Black children intersected shifting constructions of race and childhood, as a group upon which society experimented with treatments of the newly recognized social category of the child, and came to terms with the social and economic place of the nascent free Black community.

More
Public Program, Conversation Fenway Fans 16 May 2019.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Richard Flavin, Bill Nowlin, and Larry Ruttman There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). Red Sox poet laureate Dick Flavin, author Bill Nowlin, and chronicler of Red Sox history Larry ...

Red Sox poet laureate Dick Flavin, author Bill Nowlin, and chronicler of Red Sox history Larry Ruttman will gather to share stories and reminisce about some of the highs and lows in the thousands of Red Sox games they have attended. With the joy of winning the World Series fresh in our memory, these stalwart fans and prolific scribes will tell of behind-the-scenes moments not often heard. Perhaps a mystery guest will be there! Bring your own story to tell.

More
MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 18 May 2019.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Brown_Bags//hooper.jpg Brown Bag Samuel Hooper, Merchant and Politician 22 May 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Ann Daly, Brown University Samuel Hooper is best known as a politician and architect of Civil War era financial reforms like ...

Samuel Hooper is best known as a politician and architect of Civil War era financial reforms like the greenback, but before arriving in Congress, Hooper made a fortune in the China trade. Using Hooper’s papers and published writings, this talk examines how Hooper’s work as a China trader shaped his understanding of the relationship between banking, trade, and democracy; and argues that his time as a merchant directly influenced his later work regulating of banking and currency markets.

More
Public Program, Author Talk American States of Nature: The Origins of Independence, 1761-1775 22 May 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Mark Somos There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). In the British colonies, the phrase “state of nature,” or the condition of human beings ...

In the British colonies, the phrase “state of nature,” or the condition of human beings before or without political association, appeared thousands of times in juridical, theological, medical, political, economic, and other texts from 1630 to 1810. But by the 1760s, a distinctively American state-of-nature discourse started to emerge. In laws, resolutions, petitions, sermons, broadsides, pamphlets, letters, and diaries, the American states of nature came to justify independence at least as much as colonial formulations of liberty, property, and individual rights did. The founding generation transformed this flexible concept into a powerful theme that shapes their legacy to this day. No constitutional history of the Revolution can be written without it.

More
Building Closed Memorial Day 25 May 2019.Saturday, all day The MHS is CLOSED for the Memorial Day weekend.

The MHS is CLOSED for the Memorial Day weekend.

More
Building Closed Memorial Day 27 May 2019.Monday, all day The MHS is CLOSED in observance of Memorial Day.

The MHS is CLOSED in observance of Memorial Day.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Brown_Bags//6068_hartwell_work_lg.jpg Brown Bag, Research Fellow The Right to Hail an Officer at Night: Contests of Authority in Occupied Boston 29 May 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Nicole Breault, University of Connecticut Who had authority in occupied Boston? The arrival of British regulars and the encounters that ...

Who had authority in occupied Boston? The arrival of British regulars and the encounters that followed raised such questions for Boston’s night watch. Using official reports and complaints filed by the night watchmen in November of 1768, this talk explores the logistical and emotional dimensions of occupation at street level.

 

This event is free and requires no RSVP or registration.

 

More
Public Program, Author Talk Oliver Wendell Holmes: A Life in War, Law, and Ideas 29 May 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Stephen Budiansky There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). Oliver Wendell Holmes twice escaped death as a young Union officer in the Civil War when musket ...

Oliver Wendell Holmes twice escaped death as a young Union officer in the Civil War when musket balls missed his heart and spinal cord by a fraction of an inch at the Battles of Ball’s Bluff and Antietam. He lived ever after with unwavering moral courage, unremitting scorn for dogma, and an insatiable intellectual curiosity. Named to the Supreme Court by Theodore Roosevelt at age sixty-one, he served for nearly three decades, writing a series of famous, eloquent, and often dissenting opinions that would prove prophetic in securing freedom of speech, protecting the rights of criminal defendants, and ending the Court’s reactionary resistance to social and economic reforms.

 

More
Library Closed, Notice Library and Exhibitions Closed 31 May 2019.Friday, all day The library and exhibition galleries are closed for a staff development event.

The library and exhibition galleries are closed for a staff development event.

More
More events
Brown Bag Shinbone and Beefsteak: Meat, Science, and the Labor Question 1 May 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Molly S. Laas, University of Göttingen Medical School

Could better nutrition help shore up U.S. democracy in an era of mass inequality? This talk explores the early years of nutrition science in the late nineteenth century by examining the science’s use as a tool for cultural and political change. By looking at how scientists understood the relationship between wages, the cost of living, and better nutrition, my paper will shed light on the political life of scientific ideas.

close

MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 4 May 2019.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

close

Public Program Preserving Family Papers 4 May 2019.Saturday, 11:30AM - 1:00PM Registration for this workshop is now full.

Do you have boxes full of family papers and photographs sitting in your closet, basement, or attic? Are you wondering how to best preserve those precious memories for generations to come? Let the experts at the MHS teach you simple steps you can take to preserve your paper-based materials. This workshop concludes with a behind-the-scenes tour including our conservation lab and library stacks.

close

Notice Library Closing @ 3:00PM 4 May 2019.Saturday, all day

In preparation for a public program, the library closes at 3:00PM.

close

Public Program, Conversation The Problem of Democracy: The Presidents Adams Confront the Cult of Personality 4 May 2019.Saturday, 4:30PM - 6:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 4:00. Nancy Isenberg and Andrew Burstein There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

John and John Quincy Adams were brilliant, prickly politicians and arguably the most independently minded among leaders of the founding generation. Distrustful of blind allegiance to a political party, they brought skepticism of a brand-new system of government to the country’s first 50 years. Join Isenberg and Burstein as they boldly recast the historical role of the Adamses and reflect on how father and son understood the inherent weaknesses in American democracy.

close

Abigail Adams: Nature and Nurture, Pop-up Display and Talk 6 May 2019.Monday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM The Pop-up Display will be on view from April 29-June 28 May 6 at 2:00 PM: Join an Adams Papers editor for an in-depth look at the display.

“The Earth is putting on a new Suit,” Abigail Adams wrote, savoring the arrival of spring amid the tumult of national politics in 1800. Tending her kitchen garden and nurturing the new republic with equal care, Abigail delighted in learning about the natural landscape and sharing that knowledge with her family and friends.

 

close

Early American History Seminar Panel: After the Fighting: The Struggle for Revolutionary Settlement 7 May 2019.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Eliga Gould, University of New Hampshire; Katherine Grandjean, Wellesley College; Stephen Marini, Wellesley College; Brendan McConville, Boston University Moderator: Alan Rogers, Boston College

In the ten years after the American victory at Yorktown in 1781, the nation faced myriad problems and challenges. This panel examines how the revolutionary generation confronted issues of diplomacy, governance and economic growth, and how the legacies of warfare and political convulsion shaped spiritual and social behaviors in those troubled years.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

close

Brown Bag Odor and Power in the Americas: Olfactory Racism and the Atlantic World 8 May 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Andrew Kettler, University of Toronto

This talk shows that capitalism incentivized discourses of African pungency applied by intellectuals throughout the Atlantic World to justify racial dominance. Born of English literature, and agitated during the late Enlightenment, the idea that African bodies smelled perpetuates into modernity as a discourse of embodied racism.

close

Public Program Massachusetts in World War I 9 May 2019.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Theodore Sedgwick There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

On February 24, 1919, Pres. Woodrow Wilson arrived in Boston after completing the negotiations of the Treaty of Versailles that ended World War I. He was met by a thunderous crowd; the Boston Evening Globe wrote “it seemed that every noise-making instrument in Boston had been set in motion.” The Yankee Division of the Massachusetts National Guard had been one of the first U.S. units deployed in the war. Bay State residents were some of the most active in the war, both on the front lines and in shipyards outfitting navy ships; however, somehow the Great War is often forgotten. This program will explore the history of Massachusetts in WWI as well as why the forgotten war should be remembered.

close

Teacher Workshop “Shall the Tail Wag the Dog?” The Fight For and Against Women’s Suffrage 11 May 2019.Saturday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Registration fee: $25 per person

Massachusetts citizens played a central role in the suffrage movement; Worcester hosted the first national woman’s rights convention in 1850 and Bostonians, led by Lucy Stone, headed a national suffrage organization and edited a long-running woman’s rights newspaper. In response to these influential reformers, activists formed the first anti-suffrage organizations in Massachusetts as well. Drawing on MHS collections and our new suffrage exhibition, we will explore letters, newspapers, political cartoons, visual propaganda, and other sources that illuminate the history and motivations of women on both sides of the campaign for the vote.

This program is open to all K-12 educators. Teachers can earn 22.5 Professional Development Points or 1 graduate credit (for an additional fee).

If you have any questions, please contact Kate Melchior at education@masshist.org or 617-646-0588.

close

Public Program, Conversation Boston Women Designers: Then and Now 14 May 2019.Tuesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Mikyoung Kim, Tamara Roy, Regan Shields Ives, Justine Orlando, and moderator Catherine Allgor There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, Fenway Alliance and Boston Preservation Alliance members, or EBT cardholders).

Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

Join us for a conversation with women working in architecture, design, and planning. They will explore social and political landscapes for women designers in Boston today and when they got started, some challenges they overcame to get to where they are today, how Boston compares with other cities on the topic of gender equity, and if Boston is receptive to women in leadership roles.

close

Brown Bag Beyond the Boundaries of Childhood: Black Children's Cultural and Political Resistance 15 May 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Crystal Webster, University of Texas at San Antonio Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Brown_Bags//children4.jpg

This talk examines the lives of African American children in Philadelphia, New York, and Boston during the late-18th to early-20th centuries by focusing on Black children's labor, play, and schooling. It argues that northern Black children intersected shifting constructions of race and childhood, as a group upon which society experimented with treatments of the newly recognized social category of the child, and came to terms with the social and economic place of the nascent free Black community.

close

Public Program, Conversation Fenway Fans 16 May 2019.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Richard Flavin, Bill Nowlin, and Larry Ruttman There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

Red Sox poet laureate Dick Flavin, author Bill Nowlin, and chronicler of Red Sox history Larry Ruttman will gather to share stories and reminisce about some of the highs and lows in the thousands of Red Sox games they have attended. With the joy of winning the World Series fresh in our memory, these stalwart fans and prolific scribes will tell of behind-the-scenes moments not often heard. Perhaps a mystery guest will be there! Bring your own story to tell.

close

MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 18 May 2019.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org

close

Brown Bag Samuel Hooper, Merchant and Politician 22 May 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Ann Daly, Brown University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Brown_Bags//hooper.jpg

Samuel Hooper is best known as a politician and architect of Civil War era financial reforms like the greenback, but before arriving in Congress, Hooper made a fortune in the China trade. Using Hooper’s papers and published writings, this talk examines how Hooper’s work as a China trader shaped his understanding of the relationship between banking, trade, and democracy; and argues that his time as a merchant directly influenced his later work regulating of banking and currency markets.

close

Public Program, Author Talk American States of Nature: The Origins of Independence, 1761-1775 22 May 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Mark Somos There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

In the British colonies, the phrase “state of nature,” or the condition of human beings before or without political association, appeared thousands of times in juridical, theological, medical, political, economic, and other texts from 1630 to 1810. But by the 1760s, a distinctively American state-of-nature discourse started to emerge. In laws, resolutions, petitions, sermons, broadsides, pamphlets, letters, and diaries, the American states of nature came to justify independence at least as much as colonial formulations of liberty, property, and individual rights did. The founding generation transformed this flexible concept into a powerful theme that shapes their legacy to this day. No constitutional history of the Revolution can be written without it.

close

Building Closed Memorial Day 25 May 2019.Saturday, all day

The MHS is CLOSED for the Memorial Day weekend.

close

Building Closed Memorial Day 27 May 2019.Monday, all day

The MHS is CLOSED in observance of Memorial Day.

close

Brown Bag, Research Fellow The Right to Hail an Officer at Night: Contests of Authority in Occupied Boston 29 May 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Nicole Breault, University of Connecticut Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Brown_Bags//6068_hartwell_work_lg.jpg

Who had authority in occupied Boston? The arrival of British regulars and the encounters that followed raised such questions for Boston’s night watch. Using official reports and complaints filed by the night watchmen in November of 1768, this talk explores the logistical and emotional dimensions of occupation at street level.

 

This event is free and requires no RSVP or registration.

 

close

Public Program, Author Talk Oliver Wendell Holmes: A Life in War, Law, and Ideas 29 May 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Stephen Budiansky There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

Oliver Wendell Holmes twice escaped death as a young Union officer in the Civil War when musket balls missed his heart and spinal cord by a fraction of an inch at the Battles of Ball’s Bluff and Antietam. He lived ever after with unwavering moral courage, unremitting scorn for dogma, and an insatiable intellectual curiosity. Named to the Supreme Court by Theodore Roosevelt at age sixty-one, he served for nearly three decades, writing a series of famous, eloquent, and often dissenting opinions that would prove prophetic in securing freedom of speech, protecting the rights of criminal defendants, and ending the Court’s reactionary resistance to social and economic reforms.

 

close

Library Closed, Notice Library and Exhibitions Closed 31 May 2019.Friday, all day

The library and exhibition galleries are closed for a staff development event.

close


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